Orzo Salad with Corn, Tomatoes, and Basil

What is it about pasta salad that makes it such a good go-to dish to make when attending a warm weather get-together?  A few weekends ago, my friend had a few people over to swim at her pool and like the great hostess that she is, she had plenty of food and snacks waiting for guests upon arrival.  When I walked into her kitchen, I saw the biggest bowl of homemade pasta salad and turned to look at the friend I arrived with who was carrying her own container of homemade pasta salad.  We both just shrugged because, really, can you ever have too much pasta salad?  Ironically, earlier that morning, I had every intention on making Orzo Salad with Corn, Tomatoes, and Basil to take to the party but decided I didn’t have enough time.  Probably a good thing.

Even though pasta can sometimes be heavy, there is something about a cold, light pasta salad when it’s warm out that hits the spot.  This colorful pasta salad is made with orzo (rice-shaped pasta) and fresh ingredients of corn, tomatoes, and basil.  The whole mixture is livened up with a refreshing and simple vinaigrette of lemon juice, olive oil, and red wine vinegar.  I took a short-cut and used thawed frozen corn in place of fresh and didn’t really notice a difference.  I think canned would work here too.  Next time you think about making a pasta salad for a summer event, consider making this.  Just call first dibs on whose bringing the pasta salad.

The ingredients:

Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat.  While the pasta cooks, combine lemon juice, olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, pepper, and crushed garlic in a small bowl.  Set aside. 

Drain pasta and place in a large bowl.  Pour half of the dressing over orzo and toss.  Allow to cool to room temperature.  

Once pasta is at room temperature, add the remaining dressing, corn, tomato, and basil to pasta and toss to coat.  Let pasta salad stand for 30 minutes before serving to allow flavors to meld.

Additions:  None

Omissions: 

  • Red onion

Substitutions:  None

Source:  Cooking Light Magazine

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2 Comments

  1. Pingback: Orzo Salad | A Fork In Each Hand

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